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20131202
20131210
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they call foreign targets. civil rights campaigner say it's a breach of privacy. >> you are walking along minding your business thinking you'd never be of interest. if you have one of these there's every possibility that they are tracking where you've been and who you were speaking to. according to new documents, it's revealed that the american spy agency is somewhere snt region of the 5 billion pieces of information. here is how it works. you identified as an intelligence target. it's sending out signals as you are walking around. it can work out where you've been and who you've been speaking to. and if they also have a mobile phone. when you go online you may be able to encrypt your email and hide your identity. this is always broadcast. it's the size and scope that worries civil liberties campaigners. >> if we want a future that has people able to communicate and associate with each other, we need privacy of that future. >> this is not just a u.s. operation by the n.s.a. this is done on a global scale. it taps into information shared by the mobile phone companies and helps the intellig
influenced civil rights leaders here and his complicated relationship with the united states. >>> also at this hour, on the record right now, president obama is wrapping up remarks about israel during a time of tension over iran. these are some live pictures. the president literally just wrapping up. more from the white house. >>> and the budget breakthrough, a rare bipartisan plan is in the works right now. i'll ask a gop congresswoman if they'll make deadline day. >>> there will be a lot of friendships made and other kids will have a friend to play with. >> and the buddy bench. one second-grader's idea to solve loneliness is today's big idea. a lot to get to. >>> we start this hour with the release of 85-year-old american veteran merrill newman. newman arrived at san francisco international airport about two hours ago to applause. he was holding his wife's hand. the north korean government released newman late last night. they'd been holding him in the country since october. as you might imagine, newman says he is thrilled to be home. >> it's been a great homecoming. and i'm tired bu
for health care for obamacare to the civil rights and suffrage movements. some of our favorite radio talk show host are joining us tonight to take up that issue and more and we have some good news on the economy. investors, not all of them, rejected that good news on wall street. we will be talking with moody's chief economist john lonski. it's not just the mullen isles, americans just don't trust each other anymore. we explored our countries trust deficit. robbie leatherwood will speak with us next. reporter: vice president aydin in asia, trying to keep the chinese are starting a military conflict. former army four-star general jack keane on what the administration should do next as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the spark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double mi
comparing the struggle for health care for obamacare to the civil rights and suffrage movements. some of our favorite radio talk show host are joining us tonight to take up that issue and more and we have some good news on the economy. investors, not all of them, rejected that good news on wall street. we will be talking with moody's chief conomist john lonski. it's not just the mullen isles, americans just don't trust each other anymore. we explored our countries trust deficit. robbie leatherwood will speak with us next. reporter: vice president aydin in asia, trying to keep the chinese are starting a military conflict. former army four-star general jack keane on what the administration should do lou: let's take a look at the global hotspots that are not cooling. in afghanistan, president hamid karzai shutdown secretary john kerry's suggestion that the united states could rcumvent through famine have afghans defense ministers on a security agreement that would allow u.s. troops to stay in the country past next year. the spokesman of hamid karzai says he would not promote any of his minister
civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. .... they should be able to vote and have a life and build a family. their children should look at what comes from happiness and hard work. we talk about the family unit owing down the drain, and we are preventing families from going back to the. we must address the federal mindset that values our rest rates. it is not because white kids in affluent suburbs are not also smoking pot, it is they tend to be arrested and do not have as good representation and the police gravitate there because it is easier. it has been going on for a long time. it is not a purposeful racism, but we have a racial return on the war on drugs that is not fair. minority communities are easy targets. some say that is good politics. maybe it
of apartheid south africa. they struck a deal where by civil rights and democracy came immediately. property rights were respected. a truth of reconciliation commission established under archbishop tutu which allowed south africans of all races to confront their past, but without recriminations that would have made relations poisonous. which was independence, freedom and democracy and equality for all south africans. i think that's really the example of his statesman ship and his vision. >> absolutely. south africa could never have gotten there without all those things you just pointed out. thanks so much. >> years ago, you in new york had an experience to spend time with nelson mandela. >> i did. there was a town hall meeting, i helped book hundreds of people in harlem who wanted to come when his first visit here in 1990, when nelson mandela came and i was so struck by his understated, yet ree gal presence and to listen to him speak, he was very unpolitically correct. he didn't shy away from them, but just to be around somebody who personified forgiveness was a very special experience. >> a
's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. giving women the right to vote, that was hard. workers have the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been easy. for us to change how we do business in this country. >> reporter: so the president back on offense trying to put the last two months behind him and resell the affordable care act as the deadline of decembe december 23rd approach as soon as a winter storm is start to go make its way through the upper midwest after dumping snow in the west. let's take a look at these picture of a tractor trailer accident. the wow, the state highway parole said 300 car accidents across the wasatch front, a dozens of accidents were reported elsewhere in the state. let's go to dave warren. >> meteorologist: this is a wig storm and it will work its way across the mountains and bring cold air in and warm air from the south. that's the problem. the heavy snow dumped a lot of snow and caused a lot of problems on the roadway, and the cold air continues to move south. fast forward to now and tomorrow, here's the problem now we're getting w
nuclear negotiations and the syrian civil war. let's bring in washington right now. the president spoke about several issues to this group of israeli leaders and u.s. leaders. were they comfortable with his answers about iran and the recent deal to curtail iran's nuclear program? >> well, in some ways, fred, i think he said exactly what the audience wanted to hear in terms of the fact that no option is off the table. he said he wasn't sure if this agreement with iran was going to work, but if it didn't, he would still keep that military option on the take. but he also laid out some very strong red lines for a possible deal with iran. let's take a listen to what he had to say about the need for everyone to be realistic about what's possible. >> one can envision an ideal world in which iran said, we'll destroy every element and facility and you name it, it's all gone. i can envision a world in which congress passed every one of my bills that i put forward. i mean, there are a lot of things that i can envision that would be wonderful. but precisely because we don't trust the nature of the
at it as almost a proxy for what had happened in america during the civil rights movement and i think it awakened and it was a revelation for many, many americans. >> i'm sure president obama and i'm sure you'll agree was deeply disappointed when he was in south africa earlier this year, with his family, he was not able to go and meet president mandela, because he was so gravely ill. i'm sure he would have loved to have done that, but he obviously couldn't. he'll head to south africa in the coming days for the funeral, this will be an important event not only for president obama but for the united states. >> yes, and again, wolf, mandela has not been himself for a number of years. i think it was understandable he wasn't able to meet with the president. mandela say man of such great pride. the last few years when his memory was failing him, he felt awkward, seeing people, but i do think it's a great opportunity for president obama, president obama has had an important and deep focus on africa, the young african leaders initiative that he started as something that he cares a great deal about, so i
know, i was part of the civil rights movement in the south. he said oh, do you know maya angelou? she meant so much to me, reading her in prison. you were in his heart and mind all those years. >> he told charlene gault that people had been slipping my books into him all the years. i spoke with one journalist who said, can you imagine being in the hell hole of a south african prison reading the caged bird. >> this means so much to us. i know you've been through a lot in the last days. we just want to say thank you for recollections, thank you for your poetry, and thank you for being with us today. >> thank you miss mitchell. i admire. i watch you with great gratitude and appreciation. >> that is an enormous honor. >> that you very much for your own gentleness. you report on some hellish situations around the world but i never hear the hell in your voice. thank you. >> thank you for that. very much so. >> thank you. >> good-bye to you. coming up next, nelson mandela's leadership, his legacy. but first "nbc nightly news" anchor brian williams sat down in south africa with former preside
to compound. so the two things i end up by saying, i'm reminded of something the civil rights leader when he said we may have arrived on these shores in different ships, but we're all in the same boat now. what's going on in this town is that too often, the two political parties, you think they're from different countries. they view the other side as the enemy, not the fell blow citizens with whom they occasionally disagree. but in the long run, they have the sate fate, interests in common. we have to reconcile our differences, not accentuate them. but we forget we come from a common country and common heritage and for sure a common destiny. final thing i say, this is something that no labels is working to overcome. in this city today, what all of you have to do every section is forge principle compromise, the word compromise, back in the dale, my father's time, that was an act of statesmanship. today it's a act of betrayal. if you don't work with your party 100% of the time, you're ostracized, there's something wrong with you. you can see this on cable tv and a variety of other things. i'll
include allegations that employees of the department deprived jail prisoners of civil rights, also obstruction of justice allegations. apparent attempts to cover up the truth after it became clear that cases were under investigation. some of the most outlandish alleged behavior started after it became known that an informant in the jail was working with the fbi. the u.s. attorney's office said employees of the sheriff's department went so far as to try to get a judge to release names of everybody involved in the investigation and when that didn't work, allegedly tried to put the squeeze on an fbi agent. >> despite a judge's refusal to issue this order because he had no jurisdiction over the federal agency, two los angeles county sheriff's deputies, sergeants, allegedly confronted an fbi special agent outside her residence in an attempt to intimidate her into providing details about the investigation. >> reporter: now, in the past, sheriff lee bacca has said it was the fbi who was breaking the law and said there was really no attempt to intimidate the fbi agent. it doesn't really so
or government defendants. thus attorneys' fees provisions are mostly found in civil right, environmental protection and other statutes. the provision in this bill differs from other congressional exceptions in that it would require anyone who loses a patent claim to pay the attorneys' fees of even large corporate defendants. this is a giant deterrent to genuine inventors from filing good-faith suits to defend their valid patents claims. therefore i urge the adoption of the watt-conyers substitute which would drop the losers pays provisions from the underlying bill while still including the key reforms that are present in the underlying bill and in the senate bill drafted by senate -- senator leahy. i urge adoption of the substitute and i yield back the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman from new york yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. goodlatte: mr. chairman, at this time i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentlewoman from california who has been a great person to work with on the judiciary committee and here on the floor of the house on this legis
itself has caused harms, particularly in civil rights-type cases. but where there is a private party that is alleged to have forgot the government, -- alleged to have ripped off the government, that is the false claims act. host: a few issues that the false claims act. i -- that the false claims act prohibits. host: that according to the justice department. we are talking to colette matzzie about the false claims act, some of its history, and some of its applications today. matthew is up next on our line for democrats. thanks for calling "washington journal." caller: i would like to ask about the whistleblower law. can it be used for the tarp and banks that are too big to fail and can it be used for iraq, afghanistan, and syria, the eu building that we did, and the $12 trillion deficit caused? guest: well, in that context, taking the war context first, there is -- you know, there have been more cases, there will continue to be more cases. it is likely there are cases under investigation. ae typical were case involves private defense contractor who has submitted a claim to the united
for mobile justice and civil rights work. there is so much more here. he was an adviser to secretary of state condoleezza rice. when i first met him, the council of the department of state he's a member of the president's intelligence advisory board and he was for president bush and president obama and he has written a number of books. germany unified. statecraft is a good one. he wrote that with condoleezza rice and most importantly he is a member of the aspen strategy group that he directed from 2,000 to 2003. i will sort by asking michele and fill up a few questions and then i will open up to the audience. we are in a transitional period for american defense strategy. are there lessons? thathat is a build down from lat summer of the pentagon. are there lessons in earlier periods in history that can help guide us now? >> what don't you answer that question. >> good afternoon everyone. it's wonderful to see so many familiar faces around the table. i do think there are some lessons to be learned from our history in terms of periods like this where we are coming out of a period of war and we a
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
a positive environment for civil society and to protect the rights of all ukrainians to express their views on the country's future in a constructive and peaceful manner. violence and intimidation should have no place in today's ukraine. to support the aspirations of the ukrainian people to achieve a prosperous european democracy. european integration is the surest course of economic growth and strengthening ukraine's democracy. thanks very much. >> here at the end of this briefing you can see it in its entirety on c-span that -- you can wor. live coverage here on c-span again now coming back at 5:00 p.m. eastern. we posted a question on our facebook page asking about your thoughts on congressional prod uctivity. a couple of responses. michael says, when you elect people who are contentious of government, you'll get that government. tracy offers the, hail hail term limits, hourly pay. congress has to me perks, and privileges. you can post your thoughts at facebook.com/bcspan, . coming up on c-span2, french opposition leader john prince walkup a -- will talk about his recent nuclear deal wit
actually scrapped. this constitution is more emphasis that it's civil and more emphasis on people's freedoms and rights but many also feel that there is more power to the military which could mean less democracy. >> when the u.s. secretary of state john kerry was in cairo it was recognizing human rights more than democratic and what is the reaction to the way the constitution has now been shaped? >> we have already heard from americans regarding a new floor that was put in place and condemned it and said it had serious flaws and officials said the same thing and they call to the government to amendment. other provisions here that may find problematic. the u.s. is walking a delicate balance and doesn't want to interfere too much but also need to put enough pressure because many of the people expect them to do so when things are dipped to human rights violations and especially when it comes to the military getting more power. one thing we have to make clear is this referendum will be put to a vote and only if it's approved by the people the other steps and parliamentary elections an
human rights first. he'll talk about balancing national security and civil liberties. that starts at 1:15 eastern here on c-span2. >> i didn't get the idea for the dummies series. i had an idea to do a beginning book about computers, about it specifically. i kind of inspired myself to do that u just daling with people in the magazine editing job i had had. being on the radio at that time. and being out in the public and talking to people about computers. it was obviously that people wanted to learn more but that the material we had available at the time just wasn't doing the job. we had beginner box on how to use computers. but they sucked. they just didn't have that, you know, they were condescending. they were pate nice. the author was arrogant. well, you'll never get the stuff anyway or iowa, look, this is cool. people didn't want to know that. they wanted to use a computer. they planned to publish one book, and even then there was some reluctancy with the title when the owner found out they had this book. he's like you can't offend the reader. cancel that book. and unfortunately, w
civil society here around the world and everybody in this room. we should feel just as strongly as defending human right activist whether they are in egypt, russia, china, vietnam nam or any other country who are persecuted for religious beliefs or personal beliefs. these are rights we take for advantage. we should not hesitate to speak up when those rights are violated. i have met some activist who have been subjected to brutal y brutality, isolation, torture. and i am in awe by their courage and spirit and by the fact they never give up. we have a responsibility to support them. when they are in prison, this is something democrats and republicans set aside party labels, join together and work for their release. here at home, we have yet to fully recover from the effects of the 9-11 attacks. we continue to mourn the losses of innocent lives that day. we do remain vigilant against the threat of fume future attacks. but we cannot ignore it damage done by the policies put in place after 9-11. before 9-11 i doubt any of us could imagine torture, something members in both congress
kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that question. that there is a lot of variation between the states and the federal systems, and that is really one of the things that we found was that there is so much of a difference between a federal standards and the states, and the states really have so much variation between them. some of them -- the rules are state, soto the you have the separation of powers, you have the state rights. they would have a really unique form and unique standards. i could give examples of your interested. host: sure. guest: in new jersey, they asked the justices to discuss if they own any property in atlantic city. atlantic city geographically the tiny part of new jersey. i guess this came from interest in making sure there were not corruptive influences and gambling. in north carolina, they asked for any -- if any
or their legislatures judicial appointments and those kinds of things. we fought a civil war over this once before, you know, and i just don't think it is right. who --tion would be -- president obama when he severed -- when hed look for sat for 20 years and listen to reverend wright? guest: you know, i'm not quite sure how to answer that qu
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23